Don't Miss A Thing

Follow Engadget

If you were looking forward to playing Call of Duty: Advanced Warfare on the Wii U this fall, well, we have some bad news. It turns out that publisher Activision has made the decision that Nintendo's latest console won't see the futuristic shooter at all. On Twitter, a fan recently asked co-founder of Sledgehammer Games, CoD:AW's developer, if the title was coming to the Wii U and Condry replied that that wasn't happening, and that his team is focused on launching for the PC, PlayStation 4 and Xbox One. "That was an Activision decision," he wrote. This is despite the fact that CoD has appeared on the Wii U for the past two years and that a version of Advanced Warfare is coming to the PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360, which are similar in horsepower to Nintendo's HD console.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

In case you needed any more proof that we live in the future, just know that we're slowly inching toward the advent of remote-controlled, sensor-laden moths. (Moths, for the record, are constantly being tinkered with.) As it turns out, the rationale for creating a widespread network of connected, flying insects is more nuanced than just "Because we can." North Carolina State University's Dr. Alper Bozkurt says his team wants to know if they can steer moths through the air to help with search and rescue and post-disaster operations, and the first step toward getting there is sticking electrodes into moth pupae before they fully metamorphose. Alas, the team's still a ways off from achieving their dream - at this point, those electrodes are used to wireless collect information about how moths uses their muscles to flutter through the air. Still, Bozkurt is hopeful that by gaining a better understand of how moths fly, the team will eventually be able to learn how to manipulate those muscles and convert a moth into a tiny living drone.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

While Apple hasn't formally announced the iPhone 6 yet, there's few surer signs of an impending new model than a fire-sale to clear out existing stock. How's $0.97 sound for an iPhone 5c in that case? For the next 90 days then, Walmart has your ticket and is discounting the colorful 16GB handset by just over $28. Cupertino's same-size current flagship is dipping in price for the next three months too, but the end result doesn't sound anywhere near as dramatic. The iPhone 5s is now $20 less expensive, going from $99 to $79. All of these prices are with a two year contract through AT&T, Sprint, US Cellular and Verizon. If you'd rather hold out for something new and likely much more expensive, well, September 9th is only a few weeks away.

0 Comments

ABJREK Las Vegas, Nevada, America

McDonald's is taking on a new strategy to get us to eat more of its artery cloggers -- one that involves ramping up its digital efforts. Golden Arches has just hired its first ever U.S. vice president of digital (former Ticketmaster exec Julia Vander Ploeg) and, at the same time, posted a bunch of relevant job opportunities. By the looks of it, the company wants to form a team of professionals under Vander Ploeg to be able to reach its goals, including offering "a variety of digital music and entertainment experiences" (as stated in its posting for a product director for music and entertainment) to its patrons. McDonald's is also looking for people to improve its mobile website, develop games and, more importantly, release a global mobile ordering app that customers can use anywhere they are. Sadly, the company hasn't elaborated on what its plans are at this point in time. And since you're not the only one wondering if McDonald's aims to release games and downloadable music in the future, we'll keep an eye out for more details.

0 Comments

paperdude-oculus-rift

Facebook has a storied history of shelling out bounties to whomever manages to unearth bugs in its systems, and according to The Verge now it's willing to pay out cash to folks to find who do the same for Oculus VR's code. Interested? You'll stand to make a minimum of $500 for your efforts, and just how high that reward goes depends on the complexity and severity of the issue you dig up. This sort of bug hunting has the potential to become an awfully lucrative hobby - after all, Facebook didn't shell out billions of dollars to invest in the future of communication only to skimp when it comes to patching potentially critical problems. Here's the thing, though: you probably won't be ferreting out bugs in the Oculus hardware just yet. Facebook product security engineer Neal Poole told The Verge that most of the issues facing Oculus aren't found in the face-mounted VR goggles; instead, they lay dormant on Oculus' website and in the messaging system developers use to keep tabs on each other. Yeah, we know, sort of bummer - just know that Poole didn't completely close the door on more involved bug hunts down the road.

0 Comments

The passing of actor Robin Williams affected fans from all walks of life, but gamers made a special claim to his legacy. Williams was a game enthusiast and a known fan of games like Portal, The Legend of Zelda and World of Warcraft. Now, the creators of the latter title seem to be working on an in-game memorial for the actor: a NPC named "Robin <The Entertainer>." Wowhead, a site that scours the game code for new additions, picked up three instances of the tribute in a recent update for the Warlords of Draenor beta build -- a male human, a female human and, of course, a blue genie.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

Have you done any business with UPS recently? You'd better check out the company's website: some of its stores may have leaked your personal data. After receiving a security advisory from the US Government, the company discovered that 51 UPS Stores were infected with malware, potentially compromising customer data for more than 105,000 transactions. UPS has already removed the offending software, of course, but the damage may have already been done. Now the company is trying to make good.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

Twitter on a Nexus 5
Have you noticed that you're getting a lot less spam on Twitter these days? You may have to thank a bot for that. Twitter has just shed light on BotMaker, a recently developed system that (as the name suggests) lets the social network create anti-spam bot code with very little effort. Within a few seconds, engineers can set up rules that automatically take down and track spammers, in some cases before they've even managed to post anything. Besides barring known spam links, the bots can flag suspicious behavior -- if a lot of people block an account after it sends a tweet, it's going to be watched very closely. BotMaker will also look at long-term behavior, so spammers that slip through the cracks aren't necessarily safe.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

Ask anyone who's tried maintaining a long-distance relationship: it's hard, and video chats, text messages and phone calls don't always satisfy our emotional needs. A lot of human relations are indirect, subtle actions of body language or behavior that aren't easily captured in video or text. Capturing the feeling of these unspoken cues seems is the point of "Saying things that can't be said," two students' final project at the Holon Institute of Technology. The series uses a mix of technology and familiar objects to create an abstract sense of presence between two distant partners.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

Must Reads